Tag: public procurement

2019 Priorities in State Procurement

NASPO Releases 2019 Top Priorities

Just released!!
Based on a ranking from state CPOs, the 2019 Top Ten Priorities and Five Horizon Issues for State Procurement reflect current nationwide priorities as well as forward-looking issues that are likely to impact state procurement.
Throughout 2019, NASPO will develop programs, conference sessions, research and publications around these important focus areas.
The two lists, Top 10 Priorities and Top 5 Horizon Issues for State Procurement, reflect current nationwide priorities as well as forward-looking issues that are likely to impact state procurement. To see the lists, click through to read more!

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KPIs

Meaningful KPIs in Four Easy Steps

Have you been tasked with developing Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) for your organization and don’t know where to begin? This quick primer can put you on the fast track!
We’ve all heard different variations of the phrase, “what gets measured gets done,” but how much of that is really true? What and how much of our activities do we need to measure to know whether or not we have achieved the desired results, and what changes to make moving forward?
Measuring and tracking key activities can incentivize employees to perform well and achieve success in specific areas. However, sometimes organizations can fall into the “metric trap” and drive for raw activity numbers rather than focusing on truly measuring key activities that influence their success. So how can we avoid inverse response behavior, where managers and employees end up focusing too much on numbers? Here are a few key questions you should ask before setting out on a performance measuring journey:

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NASPO Exchange

Turning “Myth” into “Fact” at the 2018 Exchange

Have you ever found yourself wondering what an episode of Discovery Channel’s MythBusters might look like if it focused on “busting” procurement myths instead of the unrealistic rumors, folklore, and movie scenes the show is famous for? I’m sure you have. NASPO decided to find out at the 2018 NASPO Exchange conference and it looked something like this: a panel of experienced suppliers and state procurement professionals onstage in New York City, sharing their collective wisdom and experience to try to debunk some of the most common myths about state procurement. Perhaps that is fewer power tools and explosive hijinks then you were hoping for, but keep reading.

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Agile Procurement

Is Agile the Answer?

“We used waterfall to put a man on the moon, so it can’t be that bad,” said Aldila Lobo, Principal with Deloitte Consulting. This line certainly got a laugh from the crowd at NASPO’s Exchange conference in New York City – but it holds a fair amount of truth as well. “Waterfall” is the non-modular procurement methodology that originated in the construction and manufacturing arenas and became popular as a method for software development and procurement. The process of development literally flows from one stage to the next. Agile, on the other hand, focuses on flexibility, continuous improvement, an embrace of change, speed, and satisfied customers. Agile comes not in stages that build on one another, but in sprints, where pieces of the larger puzzle are developed one at a time.
While Agile development and procurement methods have taken hold as an elegant solution to decades-old problems, the simple truth is what Aldila alluded to – that sometimes, for some types of procurements, waterfall is still best. However, Agile and other modular procurement methods do two things that make it easier to manage large developments: they segment risk and increase transparency. While Agile and modular procurement aren’t just for information technology procurement and software development, those are the most popular applications.

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NASPO Exchange

Ten Things Your Procurement Officer Wants You to Know

A unique aspect of NASPO’s Exchange conference is the opportunity it provides to state members and suppliers to come together and have open and honest conversation in a “safe space,” where no ideas are bad, and no questions are stupid. It is a learning and thinking environment that lends itself to useful and edifying conversations that might not otherwise take place. The session “Ten Things Your Procurement Officer Wants You to Know,” led by Stacy Gregg, Procurement Manager from the State of South Carolina, really seized the moment Exchange creates and used it to convey some hard-won truths to the supplier community in attendance.
In an overflowing room, Stacy walked through the “ten things” with care and precision – taking questions along the way and allowing CPOs and other procurement officials in the room to chime in with additional viewpoints and advice. Her list included insightful quotations from her fellow public procurement officials and is presented with many of those insights below:

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NASPO Exchange

NASPO in NYC for Exchange 2018

The 2018 NASPO Exchange hit record attendance, but that was no surprise in an exciting city and tourist destination like New York City. NASPO members and staff, suppliers from all over the country, and guest speakers and presenters descended upon Times Square in the Big Apple in mid-March for NASPO’s biggest conference of the year. This conference presents a unique opportunity to build relationships among the supplier community and state governments – the largest consumers of goods and services in the country. Exchange is a place where partnering, networking, and learning come together to develop business relationships that support public procurements that are effective, efficient, transparent, and fair.
From our 2018 host state, New York General Services Commissioner RoAnn Destito welcomed our NASPO members and partners during the opening general session and shared her home state’s motto: “Excelsior”, or “ever upward.” Destito energized the suppliers and NASPO members in attendance by applying this motto to the public procurement profession by saying, “We are moving procurement ever upward by being here and networking at the NASPO Exchange.” Commissioner Destito also presented a certificate to NASPO President Michael Jones (CPO, State of Alabama) from New York Governor Andrew Cuomo declaring March as Procurement Month in the state in honor of NASPO bringing the Exchange conference to New York City.

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News

Do We Need Net Neutrality?

Have you ever been frustrated at the slow internet speed, or experienced buffering while streaming a live ball game, or your favorite TV, Netflix, or Hulu show? We’ve all been there. In many cases, the slow speed is not intentional, but due to poor server configuration or high traffic providers are experiencing at a particular time. Now, imagine this has become the norm, because of government deregulation that now allows Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to dictate which customers get faster or slower traffic depending on how much customers pay for their services. Welcome to the network (net) neutrality debate!
To some, net neutrality may seem like just another new buzzword, but it is not a new concept. Back in the 1960s, AT&T had a monopoly of the phone industry, and the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) had to step in so that market competition was fostered to give consumer more options, as well as lower prices.
Those in favor of net neutrality believe that ISPs and network providers should treat their customers (a.k.a. “traffic”) equally as they navigate to and from any web site, application, or device. Being “net-neutral” refers to ISPs not artificially slowing down, speeding up, throttling, or setting data limits for any resources the customer is trying to access through the ISP’s connection. Keep in mind, a “customer” in this context can refer to a consumer in their home, a business, or a government agency. In other words, proponents of net neutrality argue that ISPs should not be allowed to play favorites and allow online content providers (or content owned by the ISP’s parent company) preferential treatment over another, especially if one provider pays more than another for traffic. What does this all mean? Large private businesses with deep pockets could get faster internet while the rest of us watch the buffering icon spin.
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